Rosewill FORT120 CPU Cooler

1. Introduction3. Heatsink Installation


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A Closer Look – Rosewill FORT120 Cooler

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The Rosewill FORT120 is supplied in black packaging with a photograph of the cooler on the front and various information pertaining to features on the back and sides. There is also a graph comparing the cooler to a more basic heat pipe model and the Intel stock unit.

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The bundle contains mounting brackets for AM2/+/3, LGA775 and LGA1366. There are also mounts provided for connecting two fans to the unit. One fan is provided with cooler, more specifically a 120mm PWM unit which provides 30-99 CFM of airflow at 700-2300 RPM, the noise level ranges from 15-30 dBA. Other accessories include a small sachet of thermal compound and a tool for spreading your paste of choice.

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Over the last few months we have seen a huge number of tower coolers, most of them very similar in design except for a few minor details. The Rosewill FORT120 has a couple of slightly unique features though which we will take a look at.

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There are four 8mm copper heatpipes in a U shape running through a huge array of aluminium fins. One of the features you may notice about the fins is that the ends of them are plated which increases the surface area by a fair bit. Another trick that Rosewill haven’t missed is in the concave nature of the two faces. While perhaps not as elegant as the smooth, flowing curves seen in the Thermalright 120, the staggered design will still succeed in its job of encouraging airflow and creating turbulence.

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Another feature the FORT120 boasts (that you don’t see in every tower cooler) is what Rosewill call “Stonehenge Technology”. If you notice at the base of the cooler, there are 6 pillars rising upwards and making a connection through several of the fins. Supposedly this gives a notable advantage to heat transfer to the fins and strengthens the overall structure of the cooler. A similar design concept can be found in Xigmatek’s Thor’s Hammer.

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The base of the heatsink uses direct touch technology by exposing the heatpipes directly to the CPU, a technique utilised by a number of popular manufacturers.

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