Friday | September 30, 2016
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Razer Seiren Review

Razer Seiren Review

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Razer Seiren Review – The Seiren

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Razer Seiren Review – Software

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Razer Seiren Review – User Experience and Conclusion

Looking at the design and build quality of the Seiren first we have a product which very much impresses. The casing looks and feels very high quality and the sturdy, industrial themed stand only adds to this. The LED logo really does stand out in addition to this (so some will like the fact it can be disabled) and the mic is easy enough to position within the stand. Would we change anything? Maybe put some rubber on the dials to give them a slightly nicer feel and some extra grip. Height adjustment on the desktop stand would be a real bonus too, but these are just nice to have aspects rather than issues.

Setting up the Seiren is very easy, plug it in, install the software and it is good to go. It would be good if Razer could update the panel to include some sound profiles though. We also need to make note of a Windows 10 quirk for anyone who is running the beta/preview. Out of the box the Seiren will not work with Windows 10 (yet). A basic driver is installed but the mic doesn’t activate. Additionally Synapse doesnt download and install the driver. However if you have access to a Windows 8.1 PC, install the Seiren on that, install the software and then head into the folder for the program. There you will find the stand alone Seiren driver installer. Run that on Windows 10 and the Seiren works flawlessly.

On the value front, it is possible to buy a mic of near identical specification from another manufacturer, and competing mics with very similar specs from others for less however the build quality and design isn’t up to the same standard as this Razer option. Enhanced software would help set Razer apart and bundling at least the pop shield would add the extra value needed to tip some people across the line we would suggest.

Sound quality on the Seiren is very good. Easily an improvement on the more commonly used headset mics and competing well with other units above £100/$150. That said, the various patterns which can be selected will likely be used by few (better to have and not need than need and not have?) but for the most part it will be all Cardioid mode. With this enabled the sound is plenty crisp, loads of detail too and a decent flat profile which could be accused of leaning a little towards the lower end which we can work with in post. Users need to be aware though that Windows mic level of 50% and gain of about 30% is about all you will ever need. Past that and things get too loud for most uses. The mic is also not forgiving of background noise, even in Cardioid pattern. If this is to be used in a room with fan noise, keyboard noise, co-workers, a tv… all will be picked up and broadcast by the Seiren. This is potentially another area where Razer could enhance their software, offering noise reduction tech.

Above sound test recorded in near silent room, minimal fan noise, no other person in the room. Pop filter on.

Summary: The weakest aspect of the Razer Seiren for many will be its value proposition, potentially followed by the lack of options available in the software. That said, the build quality and design of the Razer Seiren are excellent and the audio quality is very good indeed.

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About Author

Stuart Davidson

Stuart Davidson is Senior Editor at HardwareHeaven having joined the site in 2002.