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With more and more people getting into high end computer gaming some things needed to change. With Microsoft making the software part of the experience more user friendly, nVidia decided to cover the hardware part. Thus the SLI-Ready initiative was started. The goal? Provide the users with a pain free experience where all components are working without a hitch at optimal settings. The OCZ memory modules we will be reviewing adhere to the strict standards and as such allow users with SLI-Ready motherboards to fully exploit the power of their memory.
 

The packaging of the SLI-Ready memory modules is nothing special, but it does a fairly good job of protecting the contents. Heavy abuse during shipping will probably damage the modules though, so it's not perfect. Concerning looks, the aggressive black and green just scream nVidia, as if the SLI logo on both sticks wasn’t enough.
The modules are rated at 6400 with timings of 4-4-4-15. Both of the modules are 1Gb sticks and can/should be used in dual channel mode. The stated speed is 800Mhz and the optimal voltage is that of 2.1V.


The cooling solution on the modules is the standard OCZ XTC heatspreader. You are probably more used to it being gold or silver from OCZ’s standard memory kits, but the black cooler with the huge SLI logo on it certainly looks badass. It's not up to par with the cooling solution found on the other recently reviewed OCZ kit, but it does a good job of dissipating all the heat the modules generate.

Testing

A pair of sticks like this belongs in a high end system, so we went with what could be considered a fast PC:
Intel E6700 CPU (stock)
Gigabyte P5N-E SLI motherboard
ATI X1950XTX Graphics Card
2Gb OCZ DDR2 PC2-6400 SLI-Ready Edition
Tagan 650w PSU
Windows Vista x86 Ultimate

System stability was tested with numerous runs of Prime, memtest86 and various benchmarking tools.

 
CR1
CR2<
4-4-4-15
400MHz
444MHz
5-5-5-15
415Mhz
460MHz

With the set being rated at 4-4-4-15 we didn't expect to be able to push it very far. Unfortunately our predictions were spot on, and not even raising the voltage to 2.3V (still covered by the warranty) helped. Lowering the command rate to 2 gave us some headroom and allowed us to go as high as 888MHz DDR. Keeping the command rate at 1 and loosening the timings didn’t help much all by itself, but combined with a rate of 2 it allowed us to go as high as 920MHz DDR.

Everest read

4-4-4-12 400MHz
5-5-5-12 460MHz
7913MB/s
7709MB/s

Everest write

4-4-4-12 400MHz
5-5-5-12 460MHz
4855MB/s
4870MB/s

Supreme Commander

4-4-4-12 400MHz
5-5-5-12 460MHz
Min
Max
Avg
Min
Max
Avg
25
37
30
24
37
29

Dark Messiah of Might and Magic

4-4-4-12 400MHz
5-5-5-12 460MHz
Min
Max
Avg
Min
Max
Avg
30
91
73
31
87
69

The results pretty much speak for themselves. At the default settings with tight timings the OCZ sticks performed the best. Theoretically the write speed was a bit better with the looser timings and higher clocks, but that advantage wasn’t noticeable in real life situations. In Dark Messiah, which is known to hog up all the memory available the tighter timings proved to be a big boon, letting the default settings win by 4fps.

It should be noted that enabling the motherboard auto overclocking, which is also SLI-enabled yielded similar results to the default settings, though the minimal framerates were a tiny bit better (1-2 fps on average). There were some problems enabling the feature though, as we had to reset the bios (via jumpers) twice before the bios configuration utility finally managed to set everything up without making the system unbootable. It turned out that all of the bios settings had to be at their default values for the automatic configuration utility to do its job – something a user unfamiliar with bios settings should have to deal with in the first place.

Conclusion

The OCZ DDR2 800MHz SLI-Ready modules aren’t aimed at the hardcore enthusiast. Instead, they are targeted at the enthusiasts who care about quality and speed, but don’t want to give too much thought at timing settings. In combination with a SLI-Enabled motherboard the modules allow users to overclock them slightly without breaking a sweat.

The results we got are slightly above average for a pair of 6400 rated modules, which proves the quality OCZ aims to deliver. The XTC cooling solution won’t win any competitions, but it does an adequate job of keeping the modules well under the threshold. At £130 they aren't amongst the cheapest modules available, but with a lifelong warranty as well as the extended warranty which allows you to push voltages up to 2.3V they more than make up for that. Just keep in mind that they are not the best overclockers out there and that you might have to leave everything up to nVidia to get the most out of them.


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