Does this sound right?

Discussion in 'Overclocking, Benching & Modding' started by RE III - Frankie, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    It's better to overvolt your CPU when overclocking to more than required because the cpu won't overheat unless it's using those volts so even if you go over the normal or (recommended voltage line it's ok because like I said before those volts won't be used unless the clocks can match them. It is also better to have more than not enough. Of course don't go stupid because remember Intel don't recommend overclocking beyond normal design specs. So overvolt enough just not too much. I'd say for a E7300 VTT 1.4V, NB 1.4V V Core 1.4V. Thankyou and good luck. Don't go frying those boards now. Also remember about the voltages, you'll need the extra voltage for stability or Windows won't respond well.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2009
  2. Mousey

    Mousey HH's Official Rodent

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    Mmmkay lack of punctuation, my lungs are screaming for air lol.
    Well kinda and no, overclock until your system because unstable at stock voltage then put the voltage up a little bit so it can maintain stability.
    Increasing voltage also increases the amount of heat your CPU Will output so make sure cooling's all sorted before you begin.
    Also Intel don't even recommend installing their cpus without a "Professional" let alone overclock. lol
     
  3. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    you breath in the same manner of talking when reading?
     
  4. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    Thanks. Will do.:cool:
     
  5. NUCLEARWINTER

    NUCLEARWINTER Reap What You Sow.

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    volts are volts. technically voltage isn't used. current is(ie...amps, mili amps) what is doing the work. the higher voltage allows more current draw. the 2 byproducts of electricity are magnetism and heat. electrically P=EI(Power<watts>=Voltage times Current. i'm not sure however, watts is broken down thermally . and electronics do have a threshold of voltages it may handle without failure. that would be an important number to dig up just to make sure you don't exceed it. also know that over volting any electrical device will exponentially reduce it's lifespan.
     
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  6. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    I was recommended in another thread to keep the voltages down and I'd still be able to acheive my desired overclock. After some practice it worked so I was happy. They also said that too high a voltages will damage the system.
     
  7. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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    Yep over time unless you are running liquid nitrogen or something like the guys buddy in that other thread ([email protected] is crazy lol). Just going from memory when I looked up the maximum voltage for the E7300 is like 1.35V or something which you exceeded to achieve your O/C initially. This is the threshold NUCLEARWINTER was referring too I am sure in his post.

    (And of course heat comes into play as well depending on the cooling used)
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2009
  8. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    1.35V safely should allow for a max clock of about 3.6-3.8GHz a think. So to play it safe I should probably look at that as Max for now on air cooling I think.
     
  9. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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  10. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    Thanks. Checking it out now.
     
  11. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    My guess is that 74.1c is max before damage kicks in. Like the fire and explosions and meltdowns and what not?
     
  12. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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    I think that is an absolute maximum I would try and stay at least 15C lower even for short benchmarking runs.
     
  13. [hobo]eclipse

    [hobo]eclipse ...just bummin 'round

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    when they speak of this temp, do they mean the external sensor or the internal (individual core temps) ones?
     
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  14. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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    Not sure on that and the reason why I made my response as general as possible.
     
  15. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    These are the latest results from my 3.5GHz overclock. Barely at 55c.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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    Still higher than I would want and shows error detected after only 6 minutes which means it was unstable ...
     
  17. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    So more VCore? I didn't actually notice the error message. Does it mean it's now fried??
     
  18. Mac Daddy

    Mac Daddy New Member

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    No Bro it means the test failed because the O/C was unstable. I trust this app for testing stability even more than prime.

    What was your Vcore on that test? (Should be in the graph sets as results)
     
  19. RE III - Frankie

    RE III - Frankie Banned

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    Ok. I'm now gonna quit yet. Gotta keep at it to get it right.
     
  20. ChaosMinionX

    ChaosMinionX USB 3 dot oh

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    Being that the E7300 is a 45nm part follow these basic guidelines if you want to ensure the safety of the processor when overclocking :)

    Vcore- Try not to exceed 1.35v (only do so if you have expendable income, or better cooling than Air)

    Vtt - Do not exceed 1.4v (this is an upper limit, and should be adjusted accordingly when dealing with CPU GTL REFS if present)

    PLL - Do not go above 1.55v in BIOS, it has very little effect on overclocking 45nms.


    And as far as the bozo's that overclock by setting absurd amounts of Vcore and calling it stable (the guys that say overvolting beyond what is needed for desired OC), they have flawed logic.

    More Vcore will always increase the amount of heat dissipation needed regardless of whether or not the chip is using it, and higher Vcore increases the possibility for electron migration that could "degrade" the chip.

    Only use the amount of voltage needed for the overclock you want, alot of times Vcore can be lowered when other voltages are tuned properly.

    And as far as stability testing?

    Orthos/Prime95/OCCT use the following 3 methods

    Small FFT - is used usually to find the lowest possible Vcore and Vtt and stability when tuning CPU GTLs. This has no effect on the subsystems (NB/RAM/ETC)

    Large FFT - is used to test the Chipset/Memory Controller/NB GTL/RAM (if applicable)

    Blend - Is a little of Large and Small FFTs used to test the system in a somewhat "real world situation" however it should only be run after the other 2 tests pass.

    Linpack* - Is excellent for max thermals, as well as overall system torture. This is actually an absurd amount of work that a computer wouldnt normally ever do, it can cause BSODs in windows because of how aggressive it is (especially systems running Vista/7 with SuperFetch because it uses an enormous amount of RAM to test). *Linpack is used by Intel for stress testing their chips.

    However in some instances it can detect instability that the other 3 tests up top do not normally detect.

    Memtest86/Memtest 86+ - It should be noted that this actually is not a valid stress test for your system. It should only be used for detecting memory errors stemming from incorrect latencies or faulty modules.


    Hope this stuff helps
     
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