New build, workstation, for a friend, suggestions welcome

Discussion in 'Hardware Discussion & Support' started by Calliers, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Just got off the hedonic treadmill... Staff Member

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    He isn't going to be gaming, but you know what? If I had a million bucks I'd buy all of you guys a PC. Seriously.

    Most of my friends are rich, don't know why. I'm like the poorest amongst all my friends, lol, all the rest of them are millionaires.

    Edit: come to think of it, I was just telling his wife how I envy her and him always flying around the world whenever they get tired of this place the other night, she is very modest, but yeah they do have mula.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
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  2. Tipstaff

    Tipstaff Well-Known Member

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    Not much to add to the built system above, so I'm going to go another route here.

    Have you thought about NOT building a machine, but going another route? Say, a business grade laptop with a docking station, or pre-built computer, along with 3 monitors for either setup?

    A laptop setup would be the more flexible setup. Say, a ThinkPad X1 Extreme for around $2,500, and throw in a ThinkPad Thunderbolt 3 Workstation USB Dock which would allow for up to 4 monitors (2 DP, 2 HDMI) for around $400 (there is also another one called the Hybrid that has the same amount of display ports, plus 2 USB-C/Thunderbolt ports if I recall).

    The other option would be to go with something pre-built. I'm going to go with Lenovo here again, so something like the ThinkStation P520C. Normally the system comes with an Nvidia Quadro card, but you can get them to customize it for something different. I convinced my boss to buy 4 of these for work, primarily used for data merging, and editing. Guys that use them, love them. We even got the monitors from them too: the ThinkVision P27h-10 (IPS panels, and supports USB-C, DP, and HDMI) for $350 or so each. For us though, it was through our vendor of record, so they're leased, but still work every penny.

    Why this route? Warranty and service. With trading, every minute/hour/day you don't have access to your trading machine is money lost. When you buy a Lenovo workstation the default warranty, from them, is 3 years on-site.
     
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  3. Calliers

    Calliers Just got off the hedonic treadmill... Staff Member

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    Oh he doesn't trade as a profession, he used too, but not any more, these days he runs his own construction company.

    I think he just wants to dabble in trading again a little. But we will look at the Lenovo pre-builts and see if they are a cheaper option. Plus me and him were both looking forward to slapping the machine together. He likes computers just as much as me. :D

    Thank you for taking the time to make some additions to the thread, real appreciated.

    Edit: Plus I should mention, he's a sucker for RGB.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  4. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Considering my experience with lenovo and the "warranty and downtime solutions"... it's completely irrelevant specially where we live.... The extra dollar spent on such options is nothing but a joke because the services out here simply aren't viable and there are usually additional costs. Having dealt with a few companies that are billion dollar companies, one of which my sister works for.... their IT departments and their insistence on these specific laptops, interestingly lenovo is nothing but riddled with downtimes and problems, poor performance and rather seriously dis-pleasurable experience compared to a setup and properly maintained custom machine.

    As i said the units i sold that one broker has had utterly no problems at all outside of that first year drive failure (which was temporary due to setting him up with raid 1).... and one motherboard which occurred about 3 months after he got the system and was replaced straight away and one could easily say was a serious one off situation, since then, 2008 to now... problem free and still cranking, installing new graphics cards would certainly increase his capability for expanded display arrangements well beyond 8 displays. The extra lanes would certainly provide.

    IF your friend intends on expanding the displays i'd would quite possibly look into either the threadripper 1900x or 1920x (or the newer 2000 series) if you're unwilling to wait for 3000 series threadrippers later this fall. Why? Because at that point adding more display adapters without mudding up the floor with multiple MST hubs may prove to be a hell of a lot cheaper and easier. Leave the VII in the primary port and then add say a few much cheaper RX 560 or whatever navi brings to the table soon in order to more easily expand the number of displays. The threadripper should provide plenty of additional pci-ex 16x ports to make this possible versus the usual 2 or 3 limit on existing standard desktop boards (with very serious caveats). This is precisely why i built that guys broker system with the x58 boards, as at the time 2 displays per card were the technical limits in most situations which required me to fill all 4 of the 16x pci-ex slots on the board in order to get 8 displays functional.

    In all honesty though again, i would REALLY recommend that the 3000 series be waited on, and in the event that a slew of displays down the road are to be added, seriously consider the newer threadrippers as they should solve a LOT of the constraining problems with the existing 1000 and 2000 series models, mostly related to die to die communication and memory connections specially numa vs uma which can have very unpredictable outcomes on existing systems. Basically the recommendation is simply to simplify and eliminate the need to "fine tune" and micro manage how the systems work, as right now, one may need to use process lasso to get the most of the system, specially for cases in which certain programs show performance degradation or even stability issues when operating on the existing threadripper due to never being designed with them in mind.

    I will add though, One of the reason i built myself a x79 system was the hope and want of having a system that was rock solid and reliable and maintained a performance lead for several years with plenty for expansion. HEDT/HPED systems (which are the x58/79/99/299 currently by intel and threadrippers by amd) are about as good as you can get for the greatest performance and longevity. While others have usually replaced their standard desktop at least once and some people already 2-4 times in the same span of time that i've had my now getting so close to being 8 years old, my system still is plenty sufficient and even fast compared to most new standard desktops today. The quad channel is actually as fast as dual channel DDR4, and ddr3 quad also has some pretty serious latency advantages too. Sure i may not be clocking as high but the bandwidth and performance is very similar. While i lack m.2 nvme slots, i can however add in m.2 nvme enabled and bootable pci-ex cards in order to utilize them because i've got plenty of pci-ex lanes to choose from. Standard desktops this isn't necessarily practical on, specially with multiple graphics cards.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
  5. Tipstaff

    Tipstaff Well-Known Member

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    I'm just saying, there are other options than DIY. Lenovo was an example. I've had no issues with their "Think" series, so why would I not recommend them? Having said that, both Dell and HP have business centric workstations. Could even go with Dell Alienware, or HP Voodoo. I would just stay away from all 3 companies "consumer level" products. Those are unreliable, imo.

    IF it were me, I'd go the laptop route. Much more flexible. Docking station adds expandability, external GPU boxes are more viable now that USB-C is showing up on more and more laptops, so my gaming or accelerated video editing is covered. I can take the unit with me when I go to trade expos, on vacation, or to meet-and-greets with other traders. Or do my trading from the comfort of my lounge chair in the backyard.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2019
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  6. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Problem is that their business centric workstations, specially for multi monitor solutions are grossly over priced and usually abhorrently inferior most of the time.
     
  7. Takaharu

    Takaharu Unus offa, unus iuguolo

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    I researched into the best option for trading a short while ago as my mum trades stocks as a profession.

    Long story short, it's basically as Judas recommended - AMD route for the processor and a Radeon 7 for video editing.

    I'm not familiar with the software but if any of them are Java-based then 32GB minimum, though you wouldn't go far wrong to go 64. Hold fire on the retort trigger-finger here though - yes, 64GB does sound like a large amount but yes, trading software guzzles RAM. Add in the video editing and the system will appreciate the extra memory.

    A laptop would be a really weird choice unless space is a factor (which I highly doubt, given the monitor choice) or portability is important.
     
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  8. Calliers

    Calliers Just got off the hedonic treadmill... Staff Member

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    Yes portability isn't a factor. Thank you for your input. :)
     
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  9. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    I have a feeling you meant to say Thunderbolt 3. USB-C on its own is not enough.
     
  10. Tipstaff

    Tipstaff Well-Known Member

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    Nope. I meant USB-C. Although you're right. I should have said USB-C that supports Thunderbolt 3, or a laptop that has Thunderbolt 3. Same connector type, but yeah, I should have clarified it.

    You could also go the EXP GDC route, but that would be cumbersome, and in this case defeat the purpose.
     
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