Should i overclock?

Discussion in 'Overclocking, Benching & Modding' started by PhreakyWar, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. PhreakyWar

    PhreakyWar New Member

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    Well i can't decide... i will be running an i7 3770k on a ThermalTake Frio OCK
    But i read That overclocking reduces the lifespan of the product by a HUGE amount...
    i am still a student and i won't have any money to replace.

    What is the lifespan of OCed products compared to stock products

    How much of an advantage would i get if i OCed?

    this is my first build and i have no experience.

    So, what should i do? :confused:

    EDIT: i will use it mainly for Adobe AfterEffect,3ds Max and Gaming

    Another EDIT : The Specs i will get:

    CPU: Intel Core i7 3770k
    GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 FTW Sig 2
    MotherBoard: Gigabyte G.1 Sniper 3
    PSU: don't know please advise

    I will be using a single monitor at 1920x1080
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  2. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Depends on how well you keep it cooled.. and high the voltage ends up going..

    I've actually got some products that are still working today that were overclocked substantially...

    Lifespan can be a thing to be concerned... but proper cooling is the ticket and keeping voltages under control.

    People that try and push things to the outside extremes generally I find sometimes have a lot shorter life.. but a minimal boost usually doesn't hurt anything.

    My 3770k with a evo 212 cooler is running 4.1ghz and sticking to the 60-65*C mark under full load for days on end.. actually it hasn't been shut down for any length of time since about july 1st of 2012. So it's 9 months running at 4.1ghz nonstop.

    Some push their overclocks right up into the danger zones of 90*C or higher... these seem to really put the stress on the cpu badly...

    In the end it's up to you... And how far you go. For your use, you'd probably see a nice improvement with only a say bump to 4ghz without touching anything else.


    oh and one last rule of thumb

    DON'T DO IT IF YOU CANNOT REPLACE IT
     
  3. SeanPatrick

    SeanPatrick Member

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    Doesn't intel have a deal, where you can pay an extra 25 bucks or so when you buy your chip, and have it oc proof for a year or so? so basically you can experiment, and if you fry it they'll just replace it free of charge.
     
  4. mkk

    mkk Well-Known Member

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    It will be fast enough without overclocking. Even if on the other hand if all you do is tweak the turbo core dividers without raising any voltages (getting all cores stable at about 4.1GHz should be easy) then there's no risk.

    Seasonic G-450 would be a relatively affordable power supply of solid quality and low noise. It has the cables you need and plenty of capacity for that setup.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
  5. Dyre Straits

    Dyre Straits 10 Grandkids -2 Great-grandsons

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    I just recently got an i7 3770K and have also made some attempt at OC'ing.

    It throttles a LOT!

    Per my own thread about this, I discovered a good detailed attempt by TomsHardware at OC'ing this CPU. It's got some naggning issues and, from what T/H found out, Intel decided to use Thermal Paste instead of Fluxless Solder on the chip. Some Japanese review site decided to pry the chip's heat spreader off and replaced the Thermal Paste with much better thermal compound and was able to get a much better OC as a result.

    I'm not about to go that route!

    And, as Judas summed it up:

    If you cannot replace it, don't do it!
     
  6. Transk53

    Transk53 New Member

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    Only if you feel confidence in the hardware and yourself.
     
  7. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    A guy on another forum did it recently and it also significantly improved his CPU's OC potential and thermal properties. From the comments and the pics he posted, it's a fairly simple procedure with pretty good odds of success, but any mistake and... well, it wouldn't even make a very good paper weight.
     
  8. Neshi

    Neshi HH's cuddly Blue Bear

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    I'd say if you haven't got the money to burn, 'pretty good odds' isn't good enough to try it.

    Overclocking without touching the voltages would be a great way to learn and there is not much that can go wrong that a CMOS reset wouldn't fix. Just keep an eye on the temperature but there are plenty of programs out there that allow you to do just that.
     
  9. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    Agreed. It's really simple, but push the scalpel in too deep and just touch the die and it's gone and scratching the PCB is also likely to damage the CPU.
     

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