Ubisoft Defend Anti-Piracy Techniques

Discussion in 'Gaming News Discussion' started by comp_ali, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. orion_star

    orion_star New Member

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    Unless your connection drops frequently while your family streams video I don't see what your worry is. I highly doubt the connection will require any significant amount of bandwidth.
     
  2. Mousey

    Mousey HH's Official Rodent

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    Only just seen this, QFT :rofl:
     
  3. Optix

    Optix Slave To Technology

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    Ooh, time to stir the pot!

    BlueMak, there are some people who will always pirate games because they can. These are the tools who have hundreds of mp3's and not one album by their favorite band as well. The best that the developer/publisher could hope from these types of people is word of mouth advertising -if- the game is good enough. If the option to download a game did not exist, these people wouldn't think twice about buying a game unless it was something that they absolutely had to play and even then it would likely be a stretch. I highly doubt the majority of these people would be gamers at all.

    It's the people who can afford to buy the game but don't simply because they don't have to that are the reason developers/publishers are losing money. One of those downloads does equal a lost sale. If the option to download a game did not exist these people would waddle on down to their local store and pick one up.

    Finally, how is your family's bandwidth usage Ubisoft's concern, gascieus? Would you buy a car that is capable of going 200 miles per hour but end up being bound by a speed limit of 70 or 80 and then complain that it is the manufacturer's fault? This is a bit of a wonky analogy but I feel it fits the situation.

    Yes, this will affect people who do not have a stable connection or no connection at all. I will not debate that. Ubisoft will lose out on some sales there but to have a stable connection and base your complaints around the fact that your folks use up all of your bandwidth is ludicrous.

    I'm not sure why everybody is saying the sky is falling when you know full well someone will crack the DRM given time. I think most everyone will agree that cracks are not illegal in their eyes if the person owns the actual game although I am sure the law would say otherwise.

    There is no difference between pirating a game and smashing out a car window to steal a stereo or picking someone's pocket. Try creating something that you use to support yourself/your family only to have it stolen and see how you feel.

    I say good on Ubisoft for trying to preserve their bottom line the way they feel is best.
     
  4. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    I am not going to buy a game and then download a crack just so that it works as it should. Screw them and I don't mean the people who make the cracks. (had such an issue with a Codemasters game, their support telling me their game does not support Vista 64, me using a crack and it worked. The crack was for the copy protection...duh. Trust me, I see NO reason to buy again a Codemasters game any time soon. Not only they are unable to provide support, they lie about their products, and they don't help, screw them, why give them my money when people who illegaly download the game can play the game without any problem in the first place?)

    Big parenthesis I know.


    My connection is not the most stable in the world. There will be 1-2 times per day that I will not have internet connection for a min or so. This has nothing to do with why I am against this DRM for myself. I simply refuse to accept the requirement to ask permission whenever I want to play a single player game that I have bought from someone, anyone else. As simple as that. Later on there is the issue of what will happen with authenticating or whatever, servers in the future etc, but I won't reach that point since I will not get the game in the first place.

    Earlier yesterday I found about one game from Ubi that I want to play very much. Silent Hunter 5. It will be released soon and it will have this DRM. They have managed to make me not buy it and get it elsewhere. I guess their DRM works.
     
  5. gascieus

    gascieus Under the Crimson Air

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    I think people are missing the point; I brought up the whole video streaming whatever example to show that not everyone has a stable connection, and forcing them to do so is exactly what makes BluMak and myself dissatisfied. Of course it's Ubisoft's own doing, so they can do whatever they want; we know that.

    I am just saying this form of DRM will not deter their games from being pirated. It will only drive, albeit perhaps a small percentage - of users who do not have a constantly stable connection away from Ubisoft's games. Past statistics on all forms of DRM show that it is not working to deter games from being pirated, which is exactly why I am puzzled as to this extra hoop we gamers have to jump through. I also don't like sending my IP trivially to a company if I'm just playing in single player mode. And please, don't start with the "if you got nothing to hide, why worry." It's a logical fallacy. I'm not going to rise up and hug people who pirate games, but it doesn't mean I want to embrace Ubisoft's faulty ideals of how to defend against piracy. Who buys or don't buy games as a result is another issue, and something I am personally not debating on. I just don't think this new method of DRM will work, and I fail to see how others disagree, that's all.

    One example I can think of is Ubisoft's Prince of Persia (2008 edition). It had no form of DRM, and sold 2.2 million units within 2 months, which is stellar. Before it went on sale I remember their staff who all up in arms like, "omgz we lifted all forms of DRM, so we know it won't sell well because you pirates will just steal this like no other!" After the statistic of 2.2 million units, I haven't seen any articles by their "angry staff" regarding the lack of DRM.

    Anyway, I feel like this thread got really heated up lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2010
  6. orion_star

    orion_star New Member

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    Video streaming and stable connection are not really related to each other. My sister can be streaming loads of videos and aside from higher ping and more frequent packet loss I can play online FPS's fine, no disconnections.

    On top of that in the original Q&A there was a question about internet connection and they stated that it would pause the game and attempt reconnection. If it is unable to do so it will let you continue playing either from where you left off or your last save.

    No DRM is perfect or uncrackable, but maybe the purpose isn't so much to prevent it but to delay it. If they can delay the crackers by several days they may get more sales out of it.

    Either way none of Ubisoft's upcoming games appeal to me except possibly R.U.S.E.
     
  7. YAYitsAndrew

    YAYitsAndrew Anti-Piracy Poster Boy

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    If you don't like the new DRM, don't buy the game, and DON'T PLAY THE GAME. Amazingly the correct and legal response to not liking a product is to withhold your money; not steal it.
     
  8. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    Are you that SLOW? Seriously? If I don't buy the game as I would NORMALLY DO, BECAUSE OF THE DRM and get it elsewhere it sends the clear message that the DRM IS THE ISSUE. I don't steal it. My acquirement of the game does not get money out of Ubi's account. The only thing that stops Ubi getting the money is the DRM, not where else I get it because of it.
     
  9. YAYitsAndrew

    YAYitsAndrew Anti-Piracy Poster Boy

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    Tell me at which step it becomes legal for you to download a rip of the game:

    1. If it's a game you are interested in, you want to play it.
    2. The only way to play it legally is to pay the price the publisher is asking.
    3. The publisher adds DRM that you don't like.
    4. You no longer want to purchase the game.
    5. The publisher can remove the DRM to get sales they lost during step 4.
    6. You can legally buy the game without the DRM and finally play it.
     
  10. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    I think it is true, you are blind or you have very, and I do mean very square logic.
    That or something much worse, which I hope it is not.
    I don't know in what world you live in, but definitely not the same as I.
     
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  11. comp_ali

    comp_ali Sniper

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    I am wondering if Ubisoft have double standards regards piracy , they implement a complex DRM "in the hope to punish piracy" and on the other hand they raised the MSRP of Asssassins Creed II (PC) to 60$.
    How the heck do they expect to FORCE people to buy their games for whatever price and slap any consumer rights to actually own the game . Slavery era has gone , very soon they will recognize that the consumer have the upper hand on whatever company no matter how big it is.
     
  12. Sihastru

    Sihastru Never been clicked

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    Remember the old copy protection, when you needed to have the original CD in the drive to play the game? I used to look for *cracks* just to avoid that. These days I just use Steam.

    It's a bad move if you ask me, when I'm on the road I like to play games on my *gaming* laptop, and I am usually not connected to the internet or I have a really bad wifi hotel connection (on and off all the time). I will look for *cracks* just to avoid that, but only if I will even bother with Ubisoft anymore.

    In my opinion this DRM scheme will be the reason people will start pirating Ubisoft's games and not a solution like thay flat minded execs think.
     
  13. Mr Cairo

    Mr Cairo Require backup .... NO

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    DRM is put in place to stop pirating

    but we all know this does not work .... How ... name one game that has not been pirated because of DRM

    can anyone name one because i cant ?

    the harder the companies try to make games hack proof the harder the hackers work to do it

    lets be honest here Assassins creed 2 will be available in all the usual pirate bay places most likely a week or so before the actual game hits the shops without the DRM , and most likely it will have a working crack ...if not it will absolutely be on line and cracked about a week after release

    DRM does not work

    it just doesnt so why dont companies realise this they are in a position that they can never win suck it up and just drop DRM
     
  14. orion_star

    orion_star New Member

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    This is the purpose of the anti-piracy measures. Ideally these companies would like to have a way that prevents piracy all together, but they know for now they can't entirely stop it. However if they can delay the release of cracked versions that can mean more money in their coffers.

    These companies have a right to protect (or at least try) their investments, and afaik there is nothing out there that outright proves or disproves DRM's impact on piracy.

    If you don't approve of DRM don't buy the game, if you pirate all you do is prove to them they need to work harder on their DRM schemes.
     
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  15. Optix

    Optix Slave To Technology

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    There are tons of smart people out there who can crack a game in a matter of hours, maybe even minutes. How about a single activation from Ubisoft's servers that modifies a file hidden deep within the data files? It would do away with having to always validate your install and would delay piracy for a little while until someone figures out what file has been changed although that shouldn't be too long with a ctrl+f.

    It call comes down to Ubisoft trying to protect their property by forcing people to buy the legit game so they can continue to make a buck.

    I find it hard to believe that anybody would disagree with that.
     
  16. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    And where the pirates and "thieves" can play the game a week after release at the latest, without having to go online for their single player game, without having to rely on the internet connection or ubi's servers for just playing the game, the gamers who decided to buy the game with their money get the finger and have to keep getting punished for being nice and giving the money to Ubi. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. :mad:
     
  17. YAYitsAndrew

    YAYitsAndrew Anti-Piracy Poster Boy

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    Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory, using the latest StarForce at the time, took over a year for pirates to crack. Here's a source article:

    Gamasutra - News - Interview: The Return Of... StarForce?

    Other interesting tidbids from that article: Daemon Tools digs just as deeply into a system as the old StarForce did; installing drivers with control in very deep levels of the OS. The difference is StarForce's drivers had been verified in Microsoft's testing programs, making them safer than Daemon Tools. Pirates install Daemon Tools without second thought to play downloaded games, but condemn the exact same software techniques when used to protect the investment of the companies making them the games they love to play. Hypocritical? Illogical? It's at least one of these things!
     
  18. YAYitsAndrew

    YAYitsAndrew Anti-Piracy Poster Boy

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    Your protection method wouldn't stop the crackers at all, in fact they wouldn't even take the time to understand the protection. They would just buy the game so the file is changed on their hard drive, and then burn that to their iso.

    You're right on everything else though. Ubisoft has the right to protect their property. If they felt they couldn't make enough money they would just shut down the studios and stop making us games to play.
     
  19. orion_star

    orion_star New Member

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    I would wager a large majority of people aren't even aware of DRM, and at the same time are connected to the internet at all times, and will never even notice what you are complaining about. I honestly don't see how requiring an internet connection to play a game is punishment. Their platform isn't even out yet, for all you know things will change between now and when the first game that uses it comes out. It's not like this is starforce or securom, it basically replaces cd check with internet connection.

    To me all these DRM schemes which limit the number of installations are the ones giving the finger to the honest customer. IIRc this does not have any activation limit just that you can only have one instance online at a time, which is perfectly reasonable to me.
     
  20. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    They are both crapola and only work against the customers in the long run, not those who do not want to pay for their games.
    What happens is Ubi is placing a bet and see how far it can push customers before they say enough!
    I can't speak for others, but for me, ENOUGH!
     

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